5 Steps to Screening a Temp Worker

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By Kelly Voisin

Topics: screening a temp worker

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5-Steps-to-Screening-a-Temp-WorkerHiring terrible temp workers is just as bad—if not worse—as being short-handed. When you don’t screen employees before they come on board, you could be facing legal or health and safety issues or just dealing with unskilled, unproductive workers that do nothing to help your company reach its goals.

When you or your staffing agency have a proper screening process in place you can identify clear warning signs that tell you not to hire, so you can avoid problems before they enter your workplace. Proper due diligence can help you avoid unwanted surprises.

Here are the five steps you should be taking to screening your new temp workers.

1.  Is the temp legally allowed to work in Canada?

Have you ever been audited by the Ministry of Labour or Immigration Canada? If not, we can assure you, it isn’t a fun process. To ensure you don’t have to deal with these government entities, screening your new temp worker should include making sure that he is legally able to work in Canada. Simply checking the temp’s social insurance number can help you avoid being in legal hot water if you hire someone that isn’t allowed to work in this country. Hiring an illegal temp worker can lead to costly fines and damage your company’s reputation.

2.  Does the temp pass a background check?

Not all staffing agencies run background checks on potential employees. If this is important to you, you can find an agency that processes them or you can do it yourself. When you have sensitive information, deal with a lot of money, or simply want the peace of mind knowing that your new temp worker isn’t a criminal waiting to steal from you or partake in other illegal activities, you can protect yourself by performing background checks. Talk to your staffing agency rep to see if this is part of its usual screening process. 

3.  Was the temp honest about his work and education history?

Naturally, if your temp worker is lying about his work experience or education, that’s a huge red flag. You want to be confident that your temp is honest and that he can perform the work being assigned to him. If he’s lying about having particular safety certificates or over exaggerating about the responsibilities he had at his past workplace, you want to know about it. It can negatively affect the work he’s going to do at your company. Calling up references is a must to ensuring that the worker’s past history and education check out. Once you’re on the phone, you can also ask if he has had any issues with punctuality, accidents, management interactions, theft, or anything else you’re worried about. If in doubt of any credentials, ask to see photocopies of any degrees, diplomas, or certificates.

4.  Does the candidate have the necessary skills? 

If a temp knows you need someone with particular skills, like fast typing, he might lie on his resume to get the job. When skills are necessary to the job, create skill tests for the candidates. This way, you can avoid hiring someone that isn’t appropriate for the position.

5.  Does the temp fit within the company’s culture?

Hiring for skills and experience is important, but hiring success is also based on fit. The temp worker must be screened for his potential fit within the company culture. How well the temp can work with others, follow directions, and adapt to new environments are all factors that need to be carefully considered during the screening process.

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Kelly Voisin

Kelly Voisin is the Regional Business Manager of Liberty Staffing’s Kitchener branch location. Kelly first joined Liberty Staffing in 2006 as a Client Care Specialist. She is a Certified Human Resources Leader with over 10 years of experience in the staffing industry and 15 years of customer service experience. In her spare time, Kelly enjoys travelling and spending time with her dog. She loves summer and has been known to say, “life is better in flip flops!”

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